IMMUNISATIONS

Immunisations are an effective way to protect your children from serious diseases. Not only do they help protect the child, but they also offer protection to the wider community.


The national immunisation programme is delivered to secondary school-aged children. This includes children who may be homeschooled and others not in mainstream school. When your child is due an immunisation, you will be contacted via your child’s school. Our service does not deliver the East Riding Primary and Secondary school vaccination programme. You can contact Intrahealth on 0333 358 3397 (option 9) if you believe your school-aged child’s vaccinations are not up to date. If you are over the age of 18 you can contact your GP surgery regarding any outstanding vaccinations.

Did you know?


The following vaccinations are offered to school-aged children and will protect against the following:

  • The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has been extended to include both boys and girls aged 12 to 13 years, as part of the NHS vaccination programme.

    The HPV vaccine helps protect against cancers caused by HPV, including:

    It also helps protect against genital warts.

    To learn more please click here.

  • From September 2019, all year 8 girls and boys will receive their first of two doses of HPV vaccine. Their second dose will be offered when they are in Year 9. There is no catch-up programme for older boys.
  • Meningococcal disease strains A, C, W, Y (MenACWY). This vaccination is currently being offered to young people in year 9, together with Diphtheria Tetanus and Polio (Td/IPV).
  • Diphtheria Tetanus and Polio (Td/IPV) is given to boost protection against three separate diseases: tetanus, diphtheria and polio. This vaccination is currently being offered to young people in year 9.
  • The MMR (measles, mumps & rubella) vaccine is available to the minority of students in Y9 & above who have not yet had two doses of the combined MMR vaccine.

We offer the following vaccinations which protect children and young people against:

  • The Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination programme will help prevent more cases of HPV-related cancers in boys and girls, such as head and neck cancers, anal and genital cancers.
  • From September 2019, all year 8 girls and boys will receive their first of two doses of HPV vaccine. Their second dose will be offered when they are in Year 9. There is no catch-up programme for older boys.
  • Meningococcal disease strains A, C, W, Y (MenACWY). This vaccination is currently being offered to young people in year 9, together with Diphtheria Tetanus and Polio (Td/IPV) which is given to boost protection against 3 separate diseases: tetanus, diphtheria and polio.
  • Diphtheria Tetanus and Polio (Td/IPV) is given to boost protection against 3 separate diseases: tetanus, diphtheria and polio. This vaccination is currently being offered to young people in year 9.

Immunisation videos fro the World Health Organisation (WHO)


How do vaccine work?


Why should I get vaccinated?


Would you like to know more about what vaccinations your child is due and
when?


Learn More

Is your child changing school, college or university?

IMPORTANT

If you’re starting college or university you should make sure you’ve already had:

  • The MenACWY vaccine – which protects against serious infections like meningitis. You can still ask your GP for this vaccine until your 25th birthday.
  • Two doses of the MMR vaccine – as there are outbreaks of mumps and measles at universities. You can still ask your GP for two doses of MMR until your 45th birthday.

If you are not sure which vaccinations your child has already had, you should contact your GP surgery who will be able to check your child’s records.

Things you need to know about vaccines


*The following information has been taken from the NHS website: www.nhs.uk

Do

✔ Protect you and your child from many serious and potentially deadly diseases,

✔ Protect other people in your community – by helping to stop diseases spreading to people who cannot have vaccinations.

✔ Get safety tested for years before being introduced – they are also monitored for any side effects.

✔ Sometimes cause mild side effects that won’t last long – some children may feel a bit unwell and have a sore arm for two or three days.

✔ Reduce or even get rid of some diseases – if enough people are vaccinated.

Don’t

✘ Do not cause autism – studies have found no evidence of a link between the MMR vaccine and autism.

✘ Do not overload or weaken the immune system – its safe to give children several vaccines at a time and this reduces the amount of injections they need.

✘ Do not cause allergies or any other conditions – all the current evidence tells us that vaccinating is safer than not vaccinating.

✘ Do not contain mercury (thiomersal) or any ingredients that cause harm in such small amounts – speak to your doctor if you have any know allergies such as eggs or gelatine.

Flu vaccinations


The Flu vaccination is available every year through the NHS to help protect adults and children at risk of flu and its complications. Learn more here.

Vaccinations in East Riding Primary and Secondary schools


From 1st April 2020 all vaccinations within East Riding schools will be delivered by Intrahealth.
Intrahealth can be contacted on 0333 358 3397, Option 9.